October 31, 2017
I’m standing on a street corner in Toronto, holding a sign with an image of a first-trimester abortion victim on it. Many passers-by tend to avoid my gaze and the pamphlets in my outstretched end. A few pause to vent about why my colleagues and I are atrocious human beings who should have been aborted. A man stops in front of one of my shortest colleagues, but not to talk. He spits. She’s an easy target. It covers her face, her hair, even her arm. My eyes go wide, I fumble for my phone to film, but he’s already passed on. I rush over to help her.
October 30, 2017
When I first went to Florida to participate in the Abortion Awareness Project I was scared. I had little experience talking to people about abortion and was worried that I wouldn’t make a difference, or worse, represent the pro-life movement poorly and push people further from the truth. 
October 27, 2017
Every conversation about abortion is at the same time a conversation about human rights. Human rights comprise many areas of human life which themselves open up to a variety of conversations on the multiple facets and practical implications of each right. Discussions on the right to life are integral to the broader picture, and an inadequate treatment of question in fact undermines the work in other areas of human rights. Why is that? The right to life is the necessary foundation to recognizing any other right.
October 25, 2017
Some time ago after a pro-life presentation, I swung by the Macs down the street from my house with a friend. My friend asked the cashier, a middle-aged Indian fellow, what he thought about abortion. Pro-choice, was the answer. It’s the woman’s decision at the end of the day. A week or so later, I took one of our “Choice” cards, which depict a first trimester aborted fetus, and went back to the Macs.
October 23, 2017
This past week we set up “Choice” Chain outside of a Calgary high school to catch the student lunch rush to the 7-Eleven across the road. After a couple of conversations, I learned that several of the students were post-abortive and that many of the students who we were talking with thought that ‘sleeping around’ was quite normal.  
October 19, 2017
In the summer of 2016, as I was preparing to start my fourth and final year at Western University, my good friend and talented advocate on behalf of the pre-born reached out to me with a proposition.  
October 16, 2017
CCBR is very excited to announce the hiring of Kyle Coffey as the leader of our new Winnipeg Initiative in Manitoba. This activism initiative will be a hub for coordinating local and regional CCBR activism in an effort to continue CCBR’s vision to end the killing of pre-born children by engaging all Canadians with the reality of what abortion does to pre-born children. Our poll-tested strategies that have worked so successfully in other areas of the country will now be coming to a new province!
October 13, 2017
I was doing “Choice” Chain earlier this month with some friends through my community’s activism group, London Against Abortion. We had set up outside of one of the colleges in London to reach post-secondary students with the truth about abortion. While some college students are hostile and closed-off to discussion, many will admit that they actually have not given much thought to the issue of abortion. 
October 12, 2017
There’s been a lot of commentary around the recent announcement by Ontario’s Liberal attorney general that legislation creating “bubble zones” around the province’s abortion clinics will soon be tabled. The Liberals are claiming, with utmost solemnity, that this restriction of free speech is necessary due to the “harassment” and “abuse” women are suffering while going to procure abortions. Even though the attorney general framed his case at a press release in the most dramatic terms, the only alleged example he could come up with was a man spitting on someone outside an abortion clinic.
October 11, 2017
I began university the same way a lot of pro-life students do: quietly.   During my first year, I did nothing. Naturally reserved to begin with, and at a small university with no pro-life club to speak of, I kept my head down. In second year, I transferred to a larger school and did join the pro-life club, but my involvement capped out at attending meetings and half-heartedly handing out some event flyers. 

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