Activism, Defending the Pro-Life View, Campus Activism, Street Activism, Abortion, Genocide Awareness Project, Reproductive "Choice" Campaign, Postcard Project

Consciousness and human rights

By Christine De Baets

Depending on people’s backgrounds, some like to challenge the pro-life position on scientific grounds, others on philosophical grounds. A particular point of intersection of the two perspectives – and one that comes up often – is the topic of consciousness. The term carries with it a lot of interesting intellectual tradition. However, most either only consider a narrow portion of it, or make use of it simply to serve pre-established purposes. 

I can still picture it

By Christine De Baets

Within a two hour “Choice” Chain, you can converse with a wide variety of people. Whenever I set up, taking my stack of literature and turning my sign depicting an abortion victim to face approaching pedestrians and onlookers, I never know what to expect. By the time we pack up, though, it’s sometimes hard to recall conversations in detail. That’s why I try to write down significant ones as soon as possible while they are still fresh in my mind. 

From an ultrasound technologist: the side I see

Author anonymous due to workplace/patient confidentiality

I'll never know

By Gerrit Van Dorland

Use your game sense

By Cameron Côté

Another 'choice': the right to life or the right to die?

By Justina Van Manen

One woman's abortion story: what I learned

By Maaike Rosendal

Truth, tears, and tyranny on campus

By Maaike Rosendal

Earlier this week pro-lifers in the Greater Toronto Area joined forces in order to show the truth about abortion near Ryerson University. Due to its downtown location we could exercise our Charter rights on public sidewalks while reaching hundreds of people. “This is the third time now,” lamented a pro-choice student. “Don’t they have better things to do?” 

There's no such thing as a "safe space" for bad ideas

By Jonathon Van Maren

The reporter from the Sheridan College newspaper stopped me as we were making our way out the door. He gestured back at the hallway full of irate protestors with their armloads of fabric and hastily scrawled signs. “You guys know that some people are going to be angry when you come here,” he said, sticking a tape recorder in my face. “So why do you come back?”

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The staff and volunteers at the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform have been touring colleges across Ontario this fall doing pro-life outreach, and of course this has triggered much conversation on the concept of “safe spaces” by the students and staff who expect colleges to be free of discourse that they find uncomfortable. Today, we were engaging students and having interesting conversations when a clique of protestors with signs showed up and began to position themselves around us.

Here's why our politicians won't do anything about abortion

By Jonathon Van Maren

There’s been much debate recently concerning politicians who claim to be pro-life but yet promise, hand-on-heart, that they will not do anything about the abortion issue whatsoever should those ex-utero voters they are appealing to decide to propel them to power. I am not making sweeping accusations of hypocrisy here. Many of these politicians are actually sincere in their pro-life beliefs: They have voted for motions and legislation when the opportunities arose, they are willing (to some degree or another) to articulate their pro-life position, and they genuinely sympathize with the pro-life cause. But in spite of all of this, whenever they begin to tread the path towards power, they suddenly begin to assure everyone that they are only personally pro-life, but that they would never do anything so insane or unthinkable as to actually broach this issue politically.

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