Dear Samantha Bee: Unfortunately, skull-stabbing is "a thing"

By Jonathon Van Maren

If there’s one thing you can count on from the media, it’s that when a pseudo-celebrity says something stupid that celebrates abortion, it will be lauded from the deserts of the Huffington Post to the wastelands of as one of the most brilliant, prescient, and also hilarious monologues ever uttered by a kind-of-famous alleged comedian. Just lately, it’s been Bill Nye the Science Guy, Trevor Noah—he’s the guy at the Daily Show in charge of creating waves of nostalgia for Jon Stewart—and now, Samantha Bee, who hosts a charming show called “Full Frontal.”

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Truth, tears, and tyranny on campus

By Maaike Rosendal

Earlier this week pro-lifers in the Greater Toronto Area joined forces in order to show the truth about abortion near Ryerson University. Due to its downtown location we could exercise our Charter rights on public sidewalks while reaching hundreds of people. “This is the third time now,” lamented a pro-choice student. “Don’t they have better things to do?” 

You're pro-life; that doesn't mean your children are

By Cameron Côté

There's no such thing as a "safe space" for bad ideas

By Jonathon Van Maren

The reporter from the Sheridan College newspaper stopped me as we were making our way out the door. He gestured back at the hallway full of irate protestors with their armloads of fabric and hastily scrawled signs. “You guys know that some people are going to be angry when you come here,” he said, sticking a tape recorder in my face. “So why do you come back?”

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The staff and volunteers at the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform have been touring colleges across Ontario this fall doing pro-life outreach, and of course this has triggered much conversation on the concept of “safe spaces” by the students and staff who expect colleges to be free of discourse that they find uncomfortable. Today, we were engaging students and having interesting conversations when a clique of protestors with signs showed up and began to position themselves around us.

Here's why our politicians won't do anything about abortion

By Jonathon Van Maren

There’s been much debate recently concerning politicians who claim to be pro-life but yet promise, hand-on-heart, that they will not do anything about the abortion issue whatsoever should those ex-utero voters they are appealing to decide to propel them to power. I am not making sweeping accusations of hypocrisy here. Many of these politicians are actually sincere in their pro-life beliefs: They have voted for motions and legislation when the opportunities arose, they are willing (to some degree or another) to articulate their pro-life position, and they genuinely sympathize with the pro-life cause. But in spite of all of this, whenever they begin to tread the path towards power, they suddenly begin to assure everyone that they are only personally pro-life, but that they would never do anything so insane or unthinkable as to actually broach this issue politically.

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Sometimes we forget to close our eyes

By Justina Van Manen

“Perspective is so important,” said me at the intern training at the beginning of the summer. “Without perspective, we lose sight of our goals, we forget what we’re fighting for . . .”

Thomas Clarkson's question--and the answer that changed the world

By Jonathon Van Maren

There are moments in the lives of men and women that, in retrospect, shift the course of human history in ways too enormous and too wonderful to even imagine at the time. In those moments, often against their will, their hearts are set ablaze for something much bigger than themselves. One of those moments was in the year 1785, when a twenty-five-year old aspiring English clergyman named Thomas Clarkson decided to enter an essay competition. He chose the topic of the slave trade—not, as he said, because he had strong feelings on the matter, but for the purpose of “obtaining literary honour.”

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Uniting for life in Alberta

By Cameron Côté

How horrifying photographs forced a king to give up his colony

By Jonathon Van Maren

It was near the turn of the century, after abolitionism had swept through Europe and seemingly conquered every defender of slavery, that a young shipping clerk named Edmund Dene Morel noticed something strange while going about his business at the harbor in Antwerp, Belgium. Ships were arriving filled to the brim with rubber—that was to be expected. But they were leaving again for the colony of Belgium’s King Leopold II not with goods to be used in payment, but with guns and ammunition. This was strange, Morel thought. The profits scraped out of the so-called free state of the Congo were gargantuan, but the only investment heading back towards the African continent was soldiers, guns, shackles, and bayonets. This could only mean one thing: regardless of the Belgian king’s flowery philanthropic descriptions of his African endeavors, Leopold must actually be running a slave state in the Congo.

The off-season

By Cameron Côté

I’ve played baseball for 20 out of the 26 summers of my life, and while some of you may think of it as a stretch, I can’t help but think of some of the similarities between an average baseball season and working for CCBR in the Calgary office.

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